Discussion:
"Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it"
(too old to reply)
indiaBPOking
2006-04-16 05:25:29 UTC
Permalink
http://www.ciol.com/content/search/showarticle1.asp?artid=82925

ORLANDO: "Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it." This was
Charlie Feld, Executive VP (Portfolio Management), EDS telling a packed
audience of 800 plus delegates at TUCON 2006, Tibco Software's annual
user conference at Omni Resort in Orlando.

In his keynote address, Feld held forth on the future technology
roadmap. Coming out in support of increasing outsourcing by
corporations, he said, "Half of what we do inside a firm today, will
be outsourced or eliminated within 20 years. This will include 50
percent of blue collar roles, 80 percent of clerical roles and 20
percent of professional roles." In fact, he felt that globalization
will accelerate. "Where, how, when and by whom the work gets done is
shifting."

Talking about the changing role of CIOs, Feld said that the 21st
century CIO has an obligation to "set agenda, build a great team and
deliver on a consistent basis." He advised all the global 2000
corporations to make a journey - "Back to the Future". His
prescription for them: well-run businesses require well-run IT
execution.

Taking of from Feld was Scott Adams, the creator of the famed Dilbert
comic strip. In his plain down to earth manner, Adams tried to make the
audience understand the connection between the day-to-day working of
corporations with the daily strip of Dilbert, which appears in more
than 2000 publications worldwide. Liberally illustrating his address
with Dilbert strips, he said, "Dilbert is all around us."

Earlier in his inaugural address, Vivek Ranadive, Chairman & CEO, Tibco
Software, brought the house down when he started his speech with, "I
have a lot of similarities with Dilbert." On a more serious note, he
went about espousing the cause of the Service Oriented Architecture
(SOA), which Tibco is so passionate about. Bashing companies like IBM
and Oracle, he thundered, "Database Oriented Architecture is an
architecture for extortion. There is a sea change occurring. Now it is
the era of Service Oriented Architecture."

In fact, he was very vocal about IBM and its actions. Taking off on the
likes of Oracle's Larry Ellison who does not let go of any opportunity
to indulge in his bout of Microsoft bashing, Ranadive also did not
mince words when it came to IBM. Some of his choicest 'compliments':
"IBM is very good at copying. IBM is not the sacred cow it used to
be. CIOs now would rather prefer not to work with IBM. We are more
stable than IBM in terms of balance sheet."

TUCON 2006 is the annual user conference of the $ 446 million Palo
Alto-based Tibco Software Inc, a business integration and process
management software company that enables real time business. The theme
of this two-day conference "Learn, Engage and Leverage" is designed
to facilitate attendees' opportunity to collaborate with an extensive
network of Tibco experts, partners, peers and industry leaders. The
basic idea is to deliver on their real-time vision and deepen their
practical knowledge of Business Process Management (BPM), business
optimization and SOA.

Asim Raina was hosted in Orlando by Tibco Software.
Joe
2006-04-16 08:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by indiaBPOking
http://www.ciol.com/content/search/showarticle1.asp?artid=82925
ORLANDO: "Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it." This was
Charlie Feld, Executive VP (Portfolio Management), EDS telling a packed
audience of 800 plus delegates at TUCON 2006, Tibco Software's annual
user conference at Omni Resort in Orlando.
Typical upper management bullshit. All they show is their disconnect from
the engineering process.

Thanks for the brain fart, BPO Troll!
nospam
2006-04-16 12:42:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by indiaBPOking
ORLANDO: "Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it." This was
Charlie Feld, Executive VP (Portfolio Management), EDS telling a packed
audience of 800 plus delegates at TUCON 2006, Tibco Software's annual
user conference at Omni Resort in Orlando.
A study show that outsourcing really does not save as claimed.

http://www.boston.com/business/technology/articles/2006/04/13/outsourcing_saves_less_than_claimed/

Outsourcing, it is mostly driven by fashion and a visceral hate the idiot
management people have against engineers and scientists.
Post by indiaBPOking
There is a sea change occurring. Now it is the era of Service Oriented
Architecture."
Yet another pointless hype. Companies like Tibco, SAP, PeopleSoft and so on
are exclusively living out of hype.

Everything their products do, can be done internally by a few engineers for
a fraction of the price and having the resulting product being closely
match for the business process itself. Today, the internet is full of open
source products, libraries and code fragments which can be used to
customize or used as parts of custom made system for your own business.

To use a third party proprietary solution vendor for your internal business
system it is just braindamaged, especially when a better more integrated
system can be build by your own engineers. But this of course, imply you
don't hate your workers.
Straydog
2006-04-16 14:13:01 UTC
Permalink
Offshore outsourcing (i.e. BPO, especially to India)
has a high failure rate and is leading to a new pheonmenon:
backsourcing/backshoring

FAQ:
QUESTION: How well is offshore outsourcing & BPO (especially to India)
really working?

ANSWER: Below are ten different sources and many comments, summaries, and
quotes that report that the failure rates are very high and satisfaction
is not very high, either. Especially in reference # 10, it is clear that
you don't get increased "productivity." Instead, when the cost goes down,
so does the quality of what comes out.

--------------
10. Three more recent articles. First: the article "Don't Offload Big IT
Problems On Outsourcers" by Rob Preston (VP.Ed-in-cheif) as appeared in
Informationweek, April 10, 2006, page 88 (may be online at
informationweek.com). Second: the large article "How Do You Spell Relief?
O-U-T-S-O-U-R-C-I-N-G" by Bruce Boardman, appearing in Network Computing,
April 1, 2006, pages 30-36, and a third article in the same issue on pages
39-48.

So what do these three articles say? The first is a one page qualitative
review of several outsourcing failures and cites "Outsourcing Backlash"
(presumably at informationweek.com/650/50iuout.htm [I have not checked
it]) and explained that any problems people have at home become magnified
when they offshore/outsource (many references to India).

The second walks people through the "process" of outsourcing/offshoring
work, including a discussion of how to do this, but also has a sidebar on
page 36 which includes a summary of a Deloitte Consulting survey of 25
organizations (worth $1 trillion in market cap, and with 1 mil employees,
and spent $50 bil on operations outsourced) and the sidebar says things
like: one in four brought functions back in house after realizing they
could do the work better, cheaper themselves, 33% of outsourcing
relationships failed in one year while 50% didn't last five years, and 57%
paid extra for services they though were included in the original
contract.

The third article also helps the IT specialist by evaluating four data
center packages (from Savvis, EDS, Globix, and Infosys). There were a
number of tables with data. Bottom line results: Infosys was the cheapest,
EDS about three times more expensive, others midway; quality of results-
Savvis and EDS got A-, Globix got B+, and Infosys got a C. You get what
you pay for.
----------------
9. Courtesy of "indiabpoking" are the following reported negatives,
failures and shortcomings of BPO, quoting his quote from the source given:

From ***@yahoo.com Mon Apr 10 18:36:37 2006
Date: 10 Apr 2006 15:36:37 -0700
From: indiaBPOking <***@yahoo.com>
Newsgroups: alt.computer.consultants, alt.politics.economics,
alt.politics.bush, sci.research.careers, soc.culture.british
Subject: Outsourcing seen as source of innovation

http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9595_22-6059512.html

"An IDC and Capgemini survey of almost 300 executives attending IDC's
Outsourcing Forum East last week found that top reasons for deciding to
use Business Process Outsourcing in a corporate strategy include
reducing costs, driving innovation, and the ability to focus on core
competencies."

[but see below]

"Additional [negatives, failures, drawbacks] survey highlights include:"

"* More than one third (38.2 percent) of participants felt the biggest
downside to outsourcing is not getting the expected results, followed
by public/customer backlash (23.5 percent), and anxiety over loosing
control (20.6 percent)."

[note that 38.2 percent is much lower than other figures cited from
other sources farther down]

"* The three most important legal issues concerning BPO today according
to those surveyed were: governance procedures (33.8%), business
continuity (27.7 percent) and intellectual property rights (26.2
percent)."

--------------------------------
8. More complaints about India:

from the article "View from Asia-India won't fully benefit from the amazing
productivity of its companies unless it builds a better infrastructure for
business" by Tom Leander (Editor-in-Chief, CFO Asia). Appearing in "CFO"
magazine for April 2006, page 27 (may be at their website:
www.cfo.com/backissues).

Some quotes:

"... GE's CFO, Keith Sherin, told CFO Asia late last year that he finds India
frustrating. 'You get excited and nothing happens,' he says. Three years ago,
GE did about the same volume of business in both India and China. Today,
China is a $3 billion market for GE, triple that of India. So, it's no surprise
when Sherin sums up GE's Asian strategy by saying that 'China is number
one, two, and three for us'."

"His primary complaint is the lack of government support for infrastructure
improvements. Turn off any highway in India and you'll know what Sherin is
talking about."

"It may be unseemly to criticise a government that has to take care of so
many poor citizens for not building better roads to facilitate commerce, but
India's CFOs point out that infrastructure is a social-welfare issue. Sumant
Sinha, CFO of leading conglomerate Aditya Birla Group, says that he spends
more on capital expenditure every year than peer companies in other nations
might. How many of them, after all, must build their own power stations?"

"But its wishful thinking [despite all the positives of India] to conclude that
India's remarkable productivity will translate into a thriving internal market
any time soon. In the eyes of most U.S. finance chiefs, China remains
number one, two, and three."
---------------------------------------
7. Backshoring...the new buzzword

Feb 13, 2006 issue of Infoworld, pages 8 (Efraim Schwartz's column) and
page 4, (editor's);

Developer poaching and rapidly rising prices are causing US based
companies to start pulling jobs back to the USA. Read about it in the
periodical.
------------------------------------------------
6. Subject: Deloitte Report: outsource failure rates

From June, 2005, CFO magazine, page 19.
(it may be on their website, www.cfo.com/BackIssues)

Deloitte Consulting was said (by the CFO article) to have said "'In the
real world, outsourcing frequently fails to deliver its promise.' wrote
researchers who surveyed 25 companies with average revenues of $50
billion. The study reveals that 70 percent of its respondents have had
significantly negative experiences and are outsourcing business processes
and IT with increasing caution."

"...there is growning evidence that large comapnies are rethinking massive
outsourcing contracts. Big name defectors that have unwound at least part
of their arrangements include Conseco, Dell, Capital One, and Lehman
Brothers."

"A sure sign that outsourcing isn't working is the amount of renegotiation
surrounding the vendor agreements, sayd Deloitte senior strategy principal
Ken Landis. 'There wasn't a single participant in the study wohe contract
went to term,' he says. 'All of them had renegotiated prior to the
contract expiration date'"

"Companies are souring on outsourcing, the survey asserts, for the same
reason it has been criticised for years: failure to live up to
cost-reduction promises, risks to intellectual property, and
confidentiatlity, and lack of transparency."

The article states that, so far, 25% of the companies have brought
services back (now called backsourcing).
------------------------------------------------------
5. From Information Week, page 8, in the Nov 21, 2005 issue.

Sidebar: "48% of all companies will spend more money on BPO this year than
in 2004"

"55% of current BPO service delivery is conductend inside the USA"

"41% of companies are satisfied with their BPO services"

So, that sounds like 100 - 41= 59% are dissatisified with their BPO
services. And, there's going to be more BPO?

Says the source is IW, Managing Offshore, and Equa Terra study of 200 BPO
customers.
-------------------------------------------------
4. "Offshoring isn't such a sure thing"
by Lora Kolodny,
Inc. magazine, September, 2005, pages 22-24

Quotes:

"Companies are finding that sending IT work overseas can
be more trouble than it's worth, according to a new survey
from DiamondCluster International, a Chicago-based
management consultancy. The number of executives
surveyed who said they were pleased with their outsourced
IT vendors fell by 17 pecentage points versus the previous
year, marking the first decline since 2002. Moreover, early
termination of relationships between buyers and offshore
service providers spiked to 51%, which is double the rate of
2004."

In other words, half of all relationships are terminated
before their first contract period is up.

In view of this, a spokesman for the consulting firm says
that "...tech buyers will think twice about sending critical
services abroad--at least for now."
--------------------------------------------------
3. From "CFO" magazine, FALL 2005, special issue, pages
40-44. (may be on www.cfo.com/Backissues)

article: "Customer Disservice: Critics say the promised
savings from offshoring come at too steep a price, while
companies say very little at all"

by Norm Alster

some content and some quotes:

This article starts by saying that on a recent talk show
where people could call in with comments and questions, it
was discovered that virtually everyone in the USA does not
like foreign call center representatives.

"But the practice of outsourcing customer service to
offshore call centers is beginning to look like a classical
idea carried too far. Critics of the pracctice point to a
growing body of evidence that suggests faulty economics
and customer dissatisfaction are forcing a rethink of what
once seemed a no-brainer."

"'The economic benefits of outsourcing customer service
are grossly overstated' according to Niels Kjellerup, a senior
partner with Australian consulting firm Resource
International and editor of a Website devoted to call centers
(www.callcenters.com.au). Customer resistance, along with
data-security concerns and the unexpectedly high costs of
managing offshore call centers, offset and dilute their
promised economic benefits, says Kjellerup."

"There is already evidence that these factors have
combined to slow the offshore migration. Several large
firms, including Dell, credit-card giant Capital One, and
insurer Conseco, have shifted at least some customer-
support operations back to the United States."

Gartner's analyst, Robert Brown, says that the initial large
growth in offshoring is expected to be, in the future, much
much smaller.

"Companies with monopolistic or overwhelmingly dominant
market positions are more apt to risk customer alienation
where near-term savings can be realized."

"Alexa Bona, a Gartner analyst based in London, predicts
that during the next three years, up to 60 percent of
companies outsourcing customer-facing service will
encounter customer defections and hidden costs that will
either cancel or outweigh any perceived savings in such
arrangements."

"He [Chris Selland, at Covington Associates in Boston]says
executives at firms that have employed offshore call centers
keep telling him that 'it's harder, it takes more management
attention, and you have to be meticulous about the way you
structure the agreement.' As a result of all this unexpected
overhead, the projected savings from offshoring can swiftly
evaporate."

The article says there is huge turnover at Indian call
centers; it can be up to 70% per year. And, with the big
expansion, there have been recruiting wars in India and
escalating pay scales.

"Martha Rogers, a consultant and author of several books
on customer relationships, contends that the metrics
generally used to measure call-center performance are
flawed."

"Many companies that outsource customer service, in fact,
don't like talking about it, and more than a dozen turned
down requests for interviews. 'Companies are looking to do
everything they can to hide the fact that they are using off
shore call centers' says Selland. 'From a political standpoint
and a customer-acceptance standpoint, it is something they
are trying to downplay.' At some Asian centers, agents are
actually trained to conceal their real names and adopt
phoney American monikers, a practice that fools few and
can further inflame an already angry caller."

"One in three respondents in a British survey said they
would stop doing business with a bank that relocates its call
centers offshore. Another study, conducted in 2004,
reported that just 5 pecent of the British are satisfied with
offshore call centers. The Irish arm of Sweden's Tele2AG, a
telecommunications firm, recently switched its call center
operation out of India and back to Ireland, citing consumer
preference."

"In an unpublished data-theft case now under investigation,
a large U.S.-based technology multinational contracted with
a call center in India without knowing that that company in
turn subcontracted a portion of the work to firms outside
India, where employees of the subcontractor apparently
managed to penetrate the American company's information
database."

"...growing outsourcing industries in Eastern Europe and
Latin America have been targeted by criminals seeking
access to customer data. "

"'For companies that regard customer service as a key part
of future revenue growth, bringing such operations back to
domestic shores is the way to go,' says Kjellerup."
---------------------------------------------------
2. From _Information Week_, page 60, Dec 19/26 issue, 2005

A short article by Paul McDougall reporting that: "...companies
operating in India, including local ones such as Infosys
Technologies, Tata Consultancy Services, and Wipro Technologies,
spend a lot of time and energy time stealing each other's
employees--and that's quickly driving up salaries" and "'There's a
lot of employee turnover [in India], and we weren't interested in that,'
says Martin Mellon, director of development at applications vendor ASG
Software Solutions. The company chose Northern Ireland over India
for its offshore development work."
--------------------------------------------------
1. Subject: "Satisfaction Wanes for Offshoring"

On page 2 of the print issue of Processor.com for June 17, 2005, volume
27, number 24:

"According to consulting firm DiamondCluster International, the number of
buyers satisfied with the providers of their offshore outsourcing has
fallen from 79% to 62%. The firm's annual survey of IT outsourcing also
revealed that 51% of buyers are terminating their outsourcing
relationships earlier than scheduled."
=============================
r***@hotmail.com
2006-04-17 08:51:27 UTC
Permalink
Interesting point.

I do think that outsourcing is a bit overdone, frankly working for a
massive outsourcing I see the prices as too high and the services too
bad, though I think as the size of data storage in the future becomes
more and more it will be more and more necessary to keep storage off
site. Its not as much doing things as storing them, and you need a
shit load of space.

I see a small enterprise probably producing 100 TB of storage
requirments every 5 years over the next decade. Shit now that I am
podCasting I have 1/5 TB and I am sure I will run out of space in a
year or so.
Panno
2006-04-17 08:43:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by indiaBPOking
ORLANDO: "Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it."
And this is good. An average American (Australian) small businessman or
manufacturer now will have to compete with the cheaply-made stuff from
China. American small business cannot compete directly with a
China-made stuff because their labor is so cheap. If the American
businessman wants to survice, he will have to become inventive and
resourceful. He will have to manufacture novel R&D-intensive stuff
which Chinese cannot manufacture (yet). The Chinese (and other BRICs)
do not have fundamental research base. And they will not have it for
the foreseeble future (10 ? 15 years ?). The reason is that the
investments into fundamental science are driven by the governmental
policy which in its turn is ultimately driven by the customers' demand.
At the moment, the customers of the China's manufacturing base are
overseas (America, Australia, Europe etc). At the moment, an average
Chinese is too poor to consume what he is manufacturing at an often
western-owned plant for export. Cinese do not consume the products, and
therefore they are incapable to know what novelty item will be in
demand in the West. We will have to wait 10-15-20 years before the
emergence of the well-off middle class in China before they can start
inventing novelty stuff for sale in America.

But before that, that is in the next 10-20 years, we should expect the
appearance of the new interesting jobs in the West because of the
unfolding of what is known under the term "globalisation". As I said
above, an average American businessman will feel threatened by the
cheap traditional stuff and services from China etc, and will be forced
to develop novel consumer goods. Of course, this transitional period
makes the practitioners of the today's business norm feeling pain. We
see it now -- an average American (especially an older less-flexible
"baby-boomer") will feel pain unless he reinvents himself. "Learn or
burn" is the old paradigm taking a new spin in the modern globalized
world. Gen X and Y will have lots of new exciting jobs to do. God bless
America.

\/
Joe
2006-04-17 09:32:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Panno
But before that, that is in the next 10-20 years, we should expect the
appearance of the new interesting jobs in the West because of the
unfolding of what is known under the term "globalisation". As I said
above, an average American businessman will feel threatened by the
cheap traditional stuff and services from China etc, and will be forced
to develop novel consumer goods. Of course, this transitional period
makes the practitioners of the today's business norm feeling pain. We
see it now -- an average American (especially an older less-flexible
"baby-boomer") will feel pain unless he reinvents himself. "Learn or
burn" is the old paradigm taking a new spin in the modern globalized
world. Gen X and Y will have lots of new exciting jobs to do.
We've heard this bullshit before and it's still not selling. We won't even
begin to count the number of falacies in your statement.

Sell the dream to someone you can fool.
Panno
2006-04-17 14:04:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe
Post by Panno
But before that, that is in the next 10-20 years, we should expect the
appearance of the new interesting jobs in the West because of the
unfolding of what is known under the term "globalisation". As I said
above, an average American businessman will feel threatened by the
cheap traditional stuff and services from China etc, and will be forced
to develop novel consumer goods. Of course, this transitional period
makes the practitioners of the today's business norm feeling pain. We
see it now -- an average American (especially an older less-flexible
"baby-boomer") will feel pain unless he reinvents himself. "Learn or
burn" is the old paradigm taking a new spin in the modern globalized
world. Gen X and Y will have lots of new exciting jobs to do.
We've heard this bullshit before and it's still not selling. We won't even
begin to count the number of falacies in your statement.
Sell the dream to someone you can fool.
Are you concerned about your bum being kicked by global competition and
thus by the coming "change" ??

\/
nospam
2006-04-17 21:54:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Panno
Post by Joe
Sell the dream to someone you can fool.
Are you concerned about your bum being kicked by global competition and
thus by the coming "change" ??
Maybe not. Maybe he is concerned about the fact that hystory repeats itself.
Goebbels proved that if you repeat a lie often enough there will always be
enough weakminded to believe it.

Look at you. You start repeating the same crap refuted thousands of times
before. The concern is that the obscene fanatic right wingers actually have
enough money to pay enough sock puppets to come over and over again to spew
their brainless propaganda.
Panno
2006-04-17 22:54:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by Panno
Post by Joe
Sell the dream to someone you can fool.
Are you concerned about your bum being kicked by global competition and
thus by the coming "change" ??
Maybe not. Maybe he is concerned about the fact that hystory repeats itself.
Goebbels proved that if you repeat a lie often enough there will always be
enough weakminded to believe it.
Look at you. You start repeating the same crap refuted thousands of times
before. The concern is that the obscene fanatic right wingers actually have
enough money to pay enough sock puppets to come over and over again to spew
their brainless propaganda.
I am an impartial observer. I do not live in the USA. I have nothing to
loose from the increased competition pressure from China etc. I can see
the situation from a side. And it is just like I what described above:
some Americans (if not most) may worry about the coming "change" in
their lifestyles, but this is the price they will have to pay for going
through the "change" due to market forces. There will be plenty of
interesting jobs in the future, though not everyone will survive for
it.
nospam
2006-04-17 23:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Panno
some Americans (if not most) may worry about the coming "change" in
their lifestyles, but this is the price they will have to pay for going
through the "change" due to market forces.
The discution is longer than that.

First there is no such thing as a free market. A 100% free market (100%
unregulated) will destroy itself as a natural evolution.

Second, the problem is not globalization in itself but the fact that a gang
of multinational corporations use it to increase the polarization betwen
poor and rich at world wide level.

Third, the polarization is going to decrease the consumer disposable income
triggering a huge recession (maybe even a depression) in US. When the
biggest market for the Asian goods collapse the recession/depression is
going to extend to world wide scale. All the earnings of today's Indian and
Chinese may vanish away.

Fourth, there are solution to prevent these nasty outcomes. But there is a
fanatical right extreme opposition well financed with corporate money to
oppose any action preventing a world wide collapse. In US they call
themself neoconservatives and some have no clue what they want believing in
obsolete mythologies while the others are well payed to promote corporate
propaganda. Many neocons are either republicans either libertarians.

They use essentially the same dumb arguments as you did to promote their
agenda. If you analyze carefully, you will figure out that your arguments
won't hold water. And not globalization is the problem. In theory
globalization can be a very good thing. The problem is that greedy
businessmans take advantage of globalization to try to impose a
neo-feudalism.
Post by Panno
I am an impartial observer. I do not live in the USA.
Then would not hurt to observe, learn and use your own judgement BEFORE
writting stuff which was refuted on these groups thousands of times before ?
Post by Panno
I have nothing to toose from the increased competition pressure from China
etc.
Unless you have your residence out of this planet you ARE GOING TO be
affected by a world wide recession. Keep in mind that the desperation
generated in Germany as a direct effect of Great Depression (started in/by
US) brought Hitler on power.

Don't bet on the fact that you won't be affected.
Post by Panno
There will be plenty of interesting jobs in the future,
though not everyone will survive for it.
Well, I assume our interest is to survive to have them. Therefore we should
take actions to protect our interests. We need to bring in power less
corrupted politicians which are actually going to reform our society so we
can survive.
Zalek Bloom
2006-04-18 11:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by Panno
some Americans (if not most) may worry about the coming "change" in
their lifestyles, but this is the price they will have to pay for going
through the "change" due to market forces.
The discution is longer than that.
First there is no such thing as a free market. A 100% free market (100%
unregulated) will destroy itself as a natural evolution.
Second, the problem is not globalization in itself but the fact that a gang
of multinational corporations use it to increase the polarization betwen
poor and rich at world wide level.
I think it is much simpler. There is a group of smart rich people that
want to be much more richer. Gobalization is about money - how to use the
world to became more richer in a democratic sociaty where people have
right to vote. And rich people are the winners. In the US rich people are
replacing American workers by cheap foreigners and convince most
Americans to call it neutral name - "BPO" or "outsourcing". Rich people
convinced American voters that Democratic party is against outsourcing,
rich people convinced American voters that it is OK to invest in the
communist China. They convinced Americans that it is OK in post 9/11 world
to allow hundreds of thousands foreigners to enter illegally the US.
And I bet that in the next election Republican/Democrat coalition will get
more than 90% of votes.
I salute to smart, rich people (with envy...).

Zalek

nospam
2006-04-17 10:44:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Panno
Post by indiaBPOking
ORLANDO: "Outsourcing is a long-term trend - bet on it."
And this is good.
You forgot about your little blue pill. Please take it next time.
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